Seeing the Brain through the Eyes

Category : Uncategorized

Friday, April 2, 2:00pm EST

See how Alzheimer’s and dementia research is evolving and take a deeper dive into vision science with Dr. Delia Cabrera DeBuc, Research Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami, who will explore eye biomarkers. She will explain how vision science is developing to help better detect disease. Next, hear from Alzheimer’s community educator, Aja Scott, who will present the 10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s. She will give insights into how to better communicate with loved ones and medical professionals about suspected symptoms. Ask questions and receive answers from the experts. Alzheimer’s Association and community resources will be offered.

Learn more and register
Please consider sharing with your contacts that speak Spanish that this program is also being offered in Spanish on April 23. To learn more call the 24/7 Helpline 800.272.3900.

COVID-19 & Diverse Communities – Part 2: A Panel Discussion on ORE Efforts Webinar – March 26, 2021

Category : Uncategorized

March 26, 2021

NACC and the Outreach, Recruitment, and Engagement (ORE) Core Steering Committee invite you to attend this one-hour webinar on March 26th.

 

COVID-19 & Diverse Communities- Part Two: A Panel Discussion on ORE Efforts

Join us to learn about up-to-date ORE efforts in racially and ethnically diverse communities and gender minorities, particularly relevant to understanding COVID-19 within diverse communities and facilitating health equity, overall.

 

OUR PANELISTS

Ethan Cicero, PhD, RN (He/Him/His/They/Them/Their)

Assistant Professor of Nursing, Emory University; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Future of Nursing Scholar

 

Rosie E Curiel Cid, PhD (She/Her/Hers)

Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine; Leader – Outreach, Recruitment, and Engagement (ORE) Core, 1Florida Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center

 

Fayron R. Epps, PhD, RN (She/Her/Hers)

Assistant Professor of Nursing, Emory University; NHCGNE Distinguished Educator in Gerontological Nursing

 

Oanh Meyer, PhD, MAS

Assistant Professor of Neurology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine

Leader – Research Education Component, Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at University of California, Davis

 

OUR MODERATOR:

Corinne Pettigrew, PhD (she/her/hers)

Assistant Professor of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; Leader – ORE Core, Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

 

Sign Up to Attend

In order to receive the Zoom link for this free webinar, you must register via Eventbrite. In doing so, you will receive automatic email reminders about the event with timely and necessary information.

 

Register for Webinar HERE

 

 

Please feel free to share this Eventbrite Link widely with your network and encourage potential attendees to register via Eventbrite.

 

Have questions you want to ask our panelists? Submit them in advance to naccmail@uw.edu

 

Questions? Contact NACC

 

NACC | https://naccdata.org

19th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment Symposium

Category : Events

The Wien Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Disorders, Mount Sinai Medical Center, and 1Florida ADRC present the 19th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment Symposium | Special Topic Workshop | Alzheimer’s Public Educational Forum
https://mcisymposium.org
February 27-28, 2021


Interview Study About Experiences with Dementia Diagnosis

Category : News

The University of Florida, Florida Atlantic University, and the University of Miami are partnering to learn more about how clinicians, patients and caregivers discuss a diagnosis of dementia. They are seeking (1) individuals who have received a diagnosis of dementia in the past 2 years; (2) caregivers of individuals who have received a dementia diagnosis in the past 2 years; and (3) clinicians (any type) who give dementia diagnoses to patients to participate in a single telephone interview about their experiences. Patients, caregivers, and clinicians participate independently and interviews are not linked. Patients and caregivers do not need to both participate. Participants will be compensated $25 for their time.

The study, sponsored by the Florida Department of Health, aims to understand the experiences of all involved in giving and receiving a dementia diagnosis. Interview data will inform development of best practices for discussing a new dementia diagnosis. Find out more about how to participate here:

Patients/caregivers: https://ufhealth.org/research-study/communication-dementia-diagnoses-patientfamily

Clinicians: https://ufhealth.org/research-study/communication-dementia-diagnoses-physician


Plan Ahead for Weather Emergencies

Category : Articles

Memory Disorder? Alzheimer’s? Plan Ahead for Weather Emergencies
Planning ahead is especially important for anyone with changes in memory function, especially if a careful medical evaluation has resulted in a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or a related disorder. When harsh weather is approaching, people with Alzheimer’s disease or one of the other more than 200 different kinds of progressive memory and thinking disorders are especially vulnerable. The stress of an approaching weather emergency may result in the person with the Alzheimer’s diagnosis functioning more poorly, worried that the approaching hurricane, tornado, or heavy winds and rain dangers have already arrived. The increased stress may impact the family caregiver’s ability to deal with the heavy load of double responsibility and decrease the ability to form plans with immediate steps to keep the loved one, themselves, and pets safe.

News of a powerful storm heading toward one’s home can easily increase the release of the stress hormone, cortisol. As cortisol is released throughout the body, the brain has reduced abilities in memory, communication, and executive functions such as thinking, paying attention to important points, inhibiting unwanted behaviors, planning, problem-solving, and judgment. Thus, the ability to plan and reason out the necessary steps to stay safe decreases. For these reasons, Planning Ahead becomes extra important.

Planning Ahead
Planning Ahead should consider two possibilities:
1) A plan when staying at home is safe and…
2) A plan when leaving home is best.

Plan When Staying at Home is Safe.
If staying at home appears safe, the At-Home Plan should include having 3-4 days of extra supplies just in case the electricity and plumbing stop working. For example, have available:

  • Extra bottles of water to drink or use for washing up
  • Extra batteries for a clock, flashlight, radio, hearing aids, etc. (Note: a self-charging, hand-crank radio or flashlight does not use batteries but uses arm “winding-up” energy)
  • Nutritional snacks (nonperishable)
  • Medicines for a week (organized in a medicine dispenser)
  • Important papers in a protected place such as a safety deposit box in a bank with copies available at home in a plastic waterproof container (copies of legal and financial papers, insurance, retirement benefits, a summary of medical conditions, medicines, etc.)

Plan When Staying at Home is Best
If your home is in the path of a severe storm, it may be safest to leave home and drive to the home of a relative or friend or to a community shelter.

Regular Community Shelter: Ahead of time, contact the community shelter to ask if they welcome people with a memory disorder such as Alzheimer’s disease or a related disorder. If you decide during a weather emergency to go to a shelter, go early to settle in a back corner near the restrooms, but away from (or not facing) distractors that may increase
anxiety, restlessness, or an anger or fear reaction. In other words, stay away or face away from the windows, entrance doors, exits, the front check-in desk or station, the kitchen, and other busy areas.
Some people with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia may find the distractions in a community center shelter to be entertaining. They should be located at the less-trafficked area of the room but facing the activities. The family caregiver should watch the loved one for fatigue or restlessness which may indicate that it is time to change to a more restful view or area of the shelter.

Special Needs Shelter: To locate the closest Special Needs Shelter, phone 1-800-96-ELDER (1-800-963-5337). Both the person with the Alzheimer’s disease or a related disorder and the caregiver must PRE-REGISTER to use a Special Needs Shelter if they have Alzheimer’s disease or a related cognitive disorder or need:

  • assistance evacuating from the home
  • electricity for life-sustaining equipment
  • oxygen
  • refrigeration for medicines or special nutrition
  • help with mobility

Leaving Home In Weather Emergency? TAKE:

  • ID bracelet or necklace: ID info in the person’s pocket, wallet, purse, clothing, etc.
  • Water (1 gallon a person for at least 3 -5 days)
  • Food: snacks (at least a 3-day supply of non-perishable, easy-to-eat food; canned food & juice; non-electric can opener); plastic bags for trash
  • Radio (hand-crank radio) (National Weather Service for news)
  • Flashlight with extra batteries or hand-crank flashlight __Medical summary (I page): chronic & acute conditions; allergies
  • Medicines (7-day supply; laminate list of medicines, dose amounts & times); bring extra oxygen or special supplies, hand sanitizer, wipes; doctor contact information
  • First aid kit, extra hearing aid batteries, small sewing kit (extra safety pins), small tool kit or multi-purpose tool
  • Personal hygiene items: favorite hand soap & body lotion; extra incontinent undies; extra clothes; comfortable, flat shoes
  • Copies of important papers (in a waterproof container): health summary (one page), recent picture ID (extra small IDs with care receiver and caregiver info), emergency contact information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, social security card, passport, birth certificates, health & life insurance policy numbers
  • Cell phone with charger
  • Extra cash (not too much & no bills higher than $20) & travel wallet/purse (wear on shoulder or waist under clothes)
  • Pet supplies (collar, leash, food, carrier, bowl, plastic bags for waste)
  • Insect repellent and sunscreen
  • Blanket, pillow (neck pillow), special quilt
  • Paper & pencil/pen; distractors (i.e., books, photo albums, recorded music, etc.)
  • Caregiver information & 2ndary caregiver backup person (& contact information)


Further information at: http://elderaffairs.state.fl.us/doea/disaster.php
Read the guide, Florida Disaster Preparedness Guide for Elders at:
http://elderaffairs.state.fl.us/doea/pubs/EU/disaster_guide.pdf


Free CME

Category : News

We, at the University of Florida (UF), have received a Florida Department of Health (FLDOH) grant to raise awareness for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and increase screening for cognitive impairment. We are focusing attention on providing additional medical education to treating clinicians. You are invited to join our online continuing medical education (CME) training at no cost to you. Through this CME, cognitive health experts from UF provide the latest information on the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of mild cognitive impairment and dementia, including referral to specialty care. You can START THE CME HERE. If you are not affiliated with the University of Florida, you can create a UF myTraining account in less than 5 minutes using the attached instructions and access the CME.


ADRC Neuropathology Cases and Discussion

Category : News

John us Thursday, December 13, 2018 from Noon to 1pm in the Communicore Building, C1-7

Ranjan Duara, MD
Anthony T. Yachnis, MD

Symptoms & Clinical Evaluation:
Ranjan Duara, MD
Medical Director: Wien Center for Alzheimer’s Disease & Memory Disorders at Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami, FL
Associate Director & Clinical Core Leader: 1Florida ADRC
PI: Alzheimer’s Disease Initiative, Florida Brain Bank

Neuropathology Findings:
Anthony T. Yachnis, MD
Professor, Program Director, Chief: Neuropathology Section,
Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Lab Medicine,
College of Medicine, University of Florida
Neuropathology Core Leader: 1Florida ADRC


ADRC Neuropathology Cases and Discussion

Category : News

Join us Thursday, September 20, 2018 from Noon to 1pm in the Communicore Building room C1-7.

Ranjan Duara, MD
Anthony T. Yachnis, MD

Symptoms & Clinical Evaluation:
Ranjan Duara, MD
Medical Director: Wien Center for Alzheimer’s Disease &
Memory Disorders at Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami, FL
Associate Director & Clinical Core Leader: 1Florida ADRC
PI: Alzheimer’s Disease Initiative, Florida Brain Bank

Neuropathology Findings:
Anthony T. Yachnis, MD
Professor, Program Director, Chief: Neuropathology Section,
Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Lab Medicine,
College of Medicine, University of Florida
Neuropathology Core Leader: 1Florida ADRC


Do Memory Problems Always Mean Alzheimer’s Disease?

Category : Articles

Many people worry about becoming forgetful. They think forgetfulness is the first sign of Alzheimer’s disease. But not all people with memory problems have Alzheimer’s.

Forgetfulness infographic icon
Share this infographic and help spread the word about what memory problems are normal and not. 

Other causes for memory problems can include aging, medical conditions, emotional problems, mild cognitive impairment, or another type of dementia.


ADRC Neuropathology Cases and Discussion

Category : News

Join use Thursday, December 7th 2017 from Noon – 1pm in HPNP building room G-114

Nikolaus McFarland, M.D., Ph.D.
Anthony T. Yachnis, M.D.

Symptoms & Clinical Evaluation:
Nikolaus McFarland, M.D., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Chief of Movement Disorders Division
of Neurology, Center for Translational Research in
Neurodegenerative Disease (CTRND), Wright/Falls/Simmons
Professorship in PSP/Atypical Parkinson’s

Neuropathology Findings:
Anthony T. Yachnis, M.D.
Professor, Program Director, Chief: Neuropathology Section,
Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Lab Medicine,
College of Medicine, University of Florida
Neuropathology Core Leader: 1Florida ADRC